Tweet- Tweet.

Twitter is  important . Its a tool in most peoples life. But it is especially important for the profession of a journalist. The social media platform not only provides a route to promote a story, it is a platform that also enables you to keep up to date with your sources.

This particular platform also allows you to find and capture your audiences’ reaction in real time¬†via their responses, plus you can keep them up-to date and provide them with a way to keep track of the stories.

Just like Facebook, twitter has a live stream function too, which is great for covering stories as they happen. ¬†The “moments” feature ¬†is perfect too with all of the breaking news ¬†gathered in one central place, updated live.

Basically, Twitter is life for a journalist and you can follow me @BithellTomCom

Like me.

Facebook is a huge part of our everyday life, whether you like it or not you still spend an average 20 + minuets a day scrolling through “your” news feed.

But exactly what keeps you scrolling?

A very special¬†algorithm. That is what keeps you hooked, or so it is supposed to. For us non technical minded folks an algorithm is “a logical arithmetical or computational procedure that if correctly applied ensures the solution of a problem” ¬†But what was¬†¬†Facebook’s’ problem? ¬†well, as it turned out, how to ensure we see the posts that really mattered to us first¬†¬†was Facebook’s top issue that kept them up at night.¬†

And to solve the issue; invent an ever-changing ¬†code that will sort the ¬†information it receives and rank it for you. That’s right according to this article I recently read, (available here) ¬†your Facebook news-feed was generated specifically for you with your interests¬†¬†taken into careful consideration.

In the original days, the data Facebook gathered from you via the links you clicked, the profiles you visited etc., was fed back into the “machine” to give you what Facebook thought you wanted to see first. Although, it would seem it did not work quite as well as they would have liked, according to the article. Only 30% ¬†of users reported that Facebook “sometimes” gave them the most interesting article, and sometimes is just not good enough so Facebook gave us the power to decide what we like, by giving us a “like” button.

It may not be clear to all, but the “Like” button has more use then just letting your friend know you like the video of the cat they posted the other day, it lets Facebook know that you specifically like that person and the cat video, so if you like more of that persons post’s you will see more of that person and you will see other cat videos, which to me makes perfect sense.

The article is very interesting once you get to the nitty grittiness of it. It makes you realise that Facebook holds a lot of power and control over what you get exposed to. I would recommend anyone download it from the kindle app and give it a read.

The kindle app by the way is great! I downloaded it onto my phone and synced it to my chrome account specially for this reading ¬†and it is so handy, easy to use and simple. It’s a forgetful persons saviour! didn’t finish that online reading last night? well whip you phone out because it will be ¬†on their (providing you remembered to save it to the app extension, which you can find here )